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demographics and birthrates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader sunday night at 9 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. and look for more online. like us on facebook. >> next on booktv, paul dickson presents a collection of words popularized by american presidents including warren g. harding's founding fathers invoked during his presidential campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like apathetic and things like that. you know, for a third grader, it was a lot of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of m
. republican senator lindsey graham has revealed he says the death toll in u.s. drone war overseas. at a speech in south carolina wednesday night, he said -- his comments mark the first time a u.s. official has offered a figure for those killed in nearly a decade of u.s. drone strikes abroad. the 4700 figure matches the high end of an estimate by the bureau of investigative journalism, which extensively has covered the strikes. the news comes as the obama administration continues to stonewall members of congress on fully releasing the justice department memos explaining the legal rationale for targeted killings overseas. the white house agreed to a least partially disclose the memos earlier this month after a senate uproar amid the conformation hearings for cia nominee john brennan. but the new york times reports the administration has adopted a strategy of continuing to deny senators full access while simultaneously negotiating with republicans to reveal more information on the deadly u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the strategy appears focused on ensuring the white house has enough votes f
. and this president has made unprecedented use of them. nbc news has obtained a government document that lays out the legal argument to justify the president's use of drones to kill al qaeda suspects, including, in some cases, u.s. citizens. our national investigative correspondent michael isikoff broke the story and has our report. >> reporter: drones have been called president obama's weapon of choice. during his four years as commander in chief, u.s. military and cia drone strikes have accelerated at an unprecedented pace. more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. eight times as many as under president bush. >> they have been very precise, precision strikes against al qaeda and their affiliates. >> these strikes are legal. they are ethical. and they are wise. >> reporter: but today, new questions about drone strikes targeting american citizens, including anwar al awlaki. born in new mexico and killed in yemen in 2011. he allegedly directed the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to blow up an airliner over detroit in 2009. but awlaki was never charged with a crime. nbc
." >> this is "bbc world news america." on the floor of the u.s. senate, protesters delay the confirmation hearing for america's next spy chief. teargas and riot police on the streets of tunis as the country's fledgling democracy struggles to survive a crisis we know it is not good for us but it is not fun, but why are so many people doing it? fledglingntry's democracy struggles to survive. we know that it is not good for us, but wire so many people doing it? welcome to our viewers on public television in america. america's drone program came -- undere nomination fire at the nomination hearing for john brennan. the man that president obama has tapped to be his next spy chief says that the white house goes through agony to make sure that there are no collateral deaths in these attacks. >> a panel of senators brimming with questions. barely a few words in, the first interruption but not from politicians. >> i am honored to appear before you today as the president's nominee. >> would you hold please? i will ask the police to please remove this woman. >> four times, protesters interrupted at the heari
his support for drones and the targeted killings of u.s. citizens. >> people that were standing up here today, i think they really have a misunderstanding of what we do as a government and the care we take, and the agony we go through to make sure we do not have any collateral injuries or deaths. >> 8 codepink protesters are arrested. we will speak with the group's founder who after returning from pakistan to protest drones, personally went to the house of john brennan, not on the door. he invited her in. we will find out what they talked about. you also speak with jeremy scahill, author of the forthcoming book and movied andirty wars," and melvin goodman, author of, "national insecurity: the cost of american militarism." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. john brennan, president of and is picked to head the cia, defended the administration's controversial counterterrorism policies during his senate confirmation hearing thursday. he attempted to justify the administration's use of drone strikes, and
us. international leaders are gathering in bavaria for the annual munich security conference. the german defense minister opened the conference by focusing on the current conflicts in syria and moly -- mali and emphasizing the importance of ongoing cooperation between europe and the united states. them in the united nations has been gridlocked over syria for months, and often, these occasions provide a more informal opportunity for an exchange of ideas. one of the most prominent speakers will be vice president joe biden of the u.s., and he stopped off in berlin on the way to the meeting. >> the u.s. vice-president peter were when visit to the german capital and his first to the german chancellery. he held an equally brief press conference after talks with chancellor merkel, giving high praise for trans-atlantic relations. the two reportedly discussed conflicts in syria and moly -- mali but made no public statements on the matter. his next stop is munich for an annual security conference, a meeting of high-ranking international policy makers, and mali and syria will be at the
now!" >> i think it is a vital tool. i have been intimately involved with the condition u.s government has been involved in and i consider without a doubt it has been very successful as far as producing intelligence. >> as counter-terrorism czar john brennan heads to capitol today for his confirmation hearing to head the cia, we will look at his role in the government's secretive post-9/11 rendition program. we will speak with amrit sing, author of the new report, "globalizing torture: cia secret detention and extraordinary rendition." >> the american public needs to know what its government did. grabbing people off the street, flying them to secret cia prisons to be locked up, shut out, held in detention and subjected to interrogation, and many instances that amounted to torture. >> then radio ambulante and the power of radio. >> we begin at the world's busiest border crossing in tijuana. it is rush hour and a mass exodus into the u.s., each with a particular mission and a baggage to prove it. summer caring suitcases, others carrying school books. >> an spanish-language radio program
in the head at this metro bus stop. the witness accounts and using this surveillance video, police andked down the suspect under second-degree murder charges. >> he was stabbed. he appeared drunk or high. we think that he saw that he and exhibitedred hate. >> they want the justice department to investigate and take over the case. intent is difficult to prove in any murder prosecution. >> there is an assistant to it a justice department policy advisor. she says defining a hate crime is not easy. it really depends on the jurisdiction. . >> there are many questions. i think all of the facts need and thet on the table decision reached as to why or this is or not a hate crime. that u.s. attorney office has declined to comment. prosecutors will have to prove killed jonesry specifically because he was transgendered. the government faces a first- charge. we are told a hate crime conviction would not add to jail time. satellitess -- and a center, richard reeve, abc 7 news. he claimed he was mistreated during his sentence for an assault. he was heldce says confinement and denied medical care. use signab
in your home state. that is the way it used to work and we can make it work that way again. there are a number of things we have to do immediately. we may disagree on how to dress them but not the need for them to be addressed. each of you are making different decisions you are grappling with it. i do not think there is much much difference. i'm not mad a governor from the time of implementing the recovery act and on now who does not think we have to do something about our infrastructure. there is very little disagreement on the need too build an education that has such immense possibilities for our people. most of these issues were united by more than what divides us. these all intersect at a place where both the state and federal governments engage. we are going to have to work together. they overlap, in many cases. we will have our differences. we should all agree that the united states has to have the highest percentage of college graduates of any nation in the world. everyone disagrees. some of you governors have led the way an early education and the consequences for
killed in a blast in the turkish capital outside the u.s. embassy. smoke has been seen from the side entrance of the building. we will get the latest from the scene. a motorway bridge collapses in china, where a truck packed with fireworks exploded. in mexico city, 25 people have been killed in an explosion at the state oil company. rescuers are trying to help the many that were trapped. can australian do enough to stop the united nations from stripping the great barrier reef of its world heritage status? also, looking at what's happening in business news. and jobs in the usa. >> the american economy is shrinking. employment, hoping for 160,000 new jobs to have been created. we will get the manufacturing reports later today as well. >> its 12 noon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey. if we start with breaking news. there's been an explosion in front of the u.s. embassy in turkey and one person has been killed. there's no indication as to what caused the explosion in a neighborhood that's home to a number of foreign missions. let's get the latest from o
thought was good for us all. i am honored to be here with american enterprise institute and for me it's like coming to the mac and the promised land and certainly we recognize the great contributions that the american enterprise is given over many years in helping us with the development of policy and understanding of what's taking place particularly here in washington d. c., so thanks for the invitation to come here and speak. we are going to talk about health care today and from a utah perspective, my view of the world when it comes to health care. it's a complicated topic and it's certainly an important topic and i know health care has been on the lips of many, the watercooler topic that it may be. i have heard the story of the four country surgeons in utah talking about health care issue and they got into the conversation of who is the easiest person to operate on? and the one doctor says i can tell you the easiest people to operate on a really mathematicians. when asked why mathematicians come to when you open them up and take them apart all of their parts are numbered so it's ve
. no state has ever done that before. he wants to get rid of his. with us to tell us why coming up later. liz: adam shapiro, how did they do? adam: earnings per share is a miss. revenue came in 699.2 million, the street expecting 698.89 million. one of the things they are saying in the report, they see sales being flat to low single digits, same-store restaurant sales excluding additional prices. last quarter talk about the need to raise prices but they are excluding that going forward into 2013. liz: i see an additional $100 million to repurchase shares of share. david: let's get some details on what is happening with these numbers as soon as they come in. and our market panel. managing director. larry, i want to go to you first come it looks like in between news after hours, the stock not being affected at all. >> not be affected at all. it is a very good by long-term. they're getting into the catering business, offering vegetarian menu, that is something that they are excited about. always throwing things against the wall hoping they will stick. upscale fast food. they have a loyal followi
, and it has carried us to our destination. have you ever wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildi
postevent features. and to get us started i want to reduce the mastermind of today's event, bernard curtis. burnet is, i learned today, one of four curators of photography in the prints and photographs division. i'm sure they are all here. it is my pleasure to turn it over to berna curtis. let's give her a and. -- in a hand. [applause] >> thank you very much, john. i have to say that we are all in this together. i'm not the mastermind. today, we have brigitte freed was the winner of the photographer whose work is featured in the book, "this is the day: the march on washington," which we are celebrating. and we have the distinguished dr. michael eric dyson, and we have paul farber. all of them here with us for a special kind of conversation, which is how we build this. i will tell you a little bit about each individual quickly. because time is of the essence. and i'd like to tell you that brigitte freed was formally brigitte pflueger, and she met leonard freed in rome in 1956. they married a year later in amsterdam where they lived, deciding to leave for life in the united states in 1963,
security at their headquarters because the spblgt used to be one of their own. christopher dorner is wanted in multiple shootings spanning six days. the 33-year-old said he's declaring war with the lapd after losing his job. according to his late and rambling manifesto, he wants to revenge until his name is clear. he writes the violence of action will be high. i will bring unconventional and asymmetrical warfare. dorner is accused of killing a couple and shooting at two police officers killing one of them. his vehicle was found in the big bear area, so far no sign of the man police describe as armed and dangerous. nbc's stephanie stanton has more from los angeles. >> reporter: this burned out truck belonging to suspect christopher dorner was found in the mountains two miles east of los angeles. but dorner himself was nowhere to be found. >> dorner is considered armed and extremely dangerous. >> reporter: dorner posted aing lengthy manifesto on facebook detailing threats against police officers he intended to kill. dorner claims he was treated unfairly when fired from the l.a. police departm
kind of cups you can use, announcing backing a styrofoam base and and says it will get in your closer to his goal of recycling one-third of the trash. restaurant owners up in arms feeling attacked. you are our mayor not r daddy. you have got to stop. that is my $0.2. have a great weekend. >> good evening, we are now looking at pictures of a live shot of boston expected to be the epicenter of the blizzard hitting this our most bracing for the effect of the potentially deadly blizzard some areas expecting 3 feet of snow we will have full coverage. among the stories vice president by then declares the government has the power to decide what kind of guns citizens may own. we will examine the historic role in the obamacare obtain and chicago police show a worsening wave of crime and now the murder capital of america, police asking for the 12 percent raise. but we will begin with a massive snowstorm affecting 50 million people blizzard warnings are in effect means through new york city in some locations are expecting between two and 3 feet and not expected to dissipate until sunday
to recovery . today, we'll be talking about youth and young adults in recovery. joining us in our panel today are tami bahr, assistant director, connections counseling, board member of recovery foundation, madison, wisconsin; jonathan katz, director, rita j. kaplan jewish community services, jewish board of family and children services, new york, new york; justin riley, at-large board member, faces and voices of recovery, seattle, washington; bridget ruiz, technical expert lead, division of systems improvement, jbs international, bethesda, maryland. bridget, 21.5 percent of 18- to 25-year-olds have an issue with illicit drugs. talk to me a little bit about that and what kind of drugs are they using. it is quite different than it was even 2 or 3 years ago. we see a huge increase in pharmaceutical drug use, not using it as prescribed. we also see an increase in alcohol use, and binge drinking is a serious problem, as well as some of the more legal types of drugs labeled as incense or those types of things in different smoke shops. and jonathan, does that hold true for what you are seeing in new
neglect them. we've got 15 members and they are rotating in us at the other things that the u.n., these rotations that generally speaking, not contentious because they rotate on a fixed and geographic basis. they are sort of an order, so there's not as much fighting as you might think maybe over membership. it is important to understand we do require a vote not just of the p5, but you've got to get a supermajority of the 15 members of the apartment to agree for security council action to go forward. so it's not just a case to block anything, but they don't have the ability to make anything they like happened. the u.n. is quite possibly the most recognized and makes the department of defense leclair by comparison. >> host: what is the effect of ms.? what is the general assembly and is a defective? >> guest: the general assembly of the meeting place above the nations. everybody has one vote. everybody has the police. you see this every year when the world leaders line up at the opening of the u.n. years, in september they each make their speech. the good part of it is the place
you with us. we look forward to taking your calls at 866-55-press. >> that's our toll-free number. i was there in the whiter house briefing room yesterday when president obama came out and called on congress to take action to avoid those massive cuts to pentagon spending known as the sequester which kick in march 1st. if march can't pass a big bill, they ought to pass a small bill to delay the sequester for a few more months. house republicans led by john boehner immediately said no way. here we go again. the party of no opposing anything obama wants. we will tell you about that. also tell you the latest on drones and a lot more here on the full court press. but first, let's get the latest. lisa ferguson is here. well, she is not here. she is in los angeles with today's current news update. hi, lisa. good morning. >> close enough. los angeles, d.c. good morning, everyone. the president is in annapolis today after 10:00 this morning and atends the conference at the western annapolis hotel. vice president biden is swearing in john kerry as secretary
in copenhagen, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your attitudes toward the automobile have changed. what do you b
can tweet us. we have 35, is already on facebook. and you can always e-mail us at urnal@cspan.org legislators step up for paid sick leave. some pretty 9% of private-sector workers are not entitled to paid time off when they fall ill according to the bureau of labor statistics. low-wage and part-time workers, particularly those who work at small firms or who work in restaurants, are among the least likely to get paid sixth time. to change that, democratic lawmakers and their allies in maryland, washington, and massachusetts, and cities including new york, philadelphia, and portland, or try to advance measures that would make a sixth time a legal requirement for most firms. in congress, senator tom harkin plans to reintroduce a federal paid sick leave bill this spring. some employers contend the measure has harmed workers with company wage and increase -- which by prompting cuts in wages or increases. we are asking you about the federal government and if there should be a federal mandate when it comes to paid sick days. here is how you can reach out to us, on our phone lin
, the obama administration claims it has legal authority to assassinate u.s. citizens overseas even if there is no intelligence indicating they are engaged in an active plot to attack the u.s. we will speak with jameel jaffer from the aclu. the obama administration is claiming the legal authority to indefinitely detain americans without charge or trial. >> the way in which our fundamental rights, our bill of rights, our constitution freedoms have been abridged by the last 10 years and more as president obama is unhappily following in that tradition. >> we will speak with whistleblower daniel ellsberg who is in new york this week to attend an appeal in his lawsuit against the ndaa. we will speak with computer security researcher jacob appelbaum who lost a federal appeals court ruling that the government could subpoena his twitter and e-mail information without a warrant as part of its probe into wikileaks. the boy scouts of america prepared to vote on whether to lift its ban on gay members. >> the question always comes down to, can case raise quick -- raise kids? most people really d
for a chance to apply for asylum in greece. >> we slept in the stores because the police came to look for us every day. >> world leaders deny there is a global currency war. are all the major powers secretly devaluing? inventors often are not rewarded. >> people who are supposed to run our innovation units treat me like dirt. >> when it comes to refugees and migrants, agrees is the front door of europe. at one point, 300 people a day were crossing greece's border with turkey illegally. on mass roundup was 70,000 people picked up off the streets in six months. these are the figures, but behind them, he minute stories. we have one man's account of his journeys through the system. this was the biggest textile factory in greece. today, it lies abandoned and is famous for something else. felt here a year ago, hundreds of migrants were squatting in the factory, desperate to get out of a greece. >> it does not feel like europe. this is no europe. >> my guide was this man. a moroccan living in the factory. place,en, as we left the i never expected to see him again. today, at the factory looks quiet,
. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
to go visit. [laughter] >> by the way, when september 11 came, all of us, i think not just in new york but the entire world were riveted to the news, and one of the journalist was interviewing a woman from the midwest who said to the reporter, you know, i've been watching the events in new york, and those people are just like us. [laughter] >> i bet some of you have said that about new yorkers. [laughter] >> that moment made me realize many things. one, that all the unhappiness of september 11, september 11, there was one sliver of sunshine, and it was in the way that americans came together. and it didn't matter what background we had or where we were from. we stood together as a nation. that was really important lesson, but it also has made me realize when i was writing this book i wanted people to see the slice of my life that was different than theirs. now, i doubt the my experience as a reporter region in new york is identical to the experience of mexicans in texas, or identical to the experience of other immigrant groups in different parts of the united states or the world. but w
want to use it. >> cindy crawford is one of the most beautiful women on earth. she's iconic and the buzz is like, "what is she doing?" >> i want to have what cindy has because she gets the super secret info that we don't get. >> what is cindy's secret? >> after more than two decades on the job, cindy remains one of the most visible faces and sought after super models in the world. >> yet her skin still looks remarkably youthful and gorgeously wrinkle-free. >> everybody wants to know "what is cindy using?" because we all know we want to look like cindy crawford. >> check out these photos. on the left, cindy at age 28. and on the right, at 41. here's another picture of cindy at 28 and on the right at age 43. and finally, cindy at 28 and today at age 45. >> how does cindy do it? >> her secret is renowned french anti-aging specialist, doctor jean-louis sebagh. >> he's been called "the wonder doctor," "a miracle worker," and "the youth guru." >> doctor jean-louis sebagh is a super exclusive doctor in paris. i was 28 when i first went to him, and i instantly noticed that my skin j
, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the legs. tell your doctor about your medical conditions and medications, especially insulin, corticosteroids, or medicines to decrease blood clotting. so...what do men do when a number's too low? turn it up! [ male announcer ] in a clinical study, over 80% of treated men had their t levels restored to normal. talk to your doctor about all your symptoms. get the blood tests. change your number. turn it up. androgel 1.62%. ♪ ♪ i don't want any trouble. i don't want any trouble either. ♪ [ engine turns over ] you know you forgot to take your mask off, right? [ siren wailing in distance ] ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new beetle convertible. now every day is a top-down day. that's the power of german engineering. [ticking] >> for more than a decade, t
pushing up fuel prices. those higher prices come as gasoline is also on the rise. joining us now with the outlook for energy, alan harry. he's portfolio manager and c.e.o. of the spartan commodity fund. alan, let me first start off by talking to you about home heating oil. we saw prices up this week 3%. what is the trend going forward? >> well, thank you for having me. what i look at right now is short term we're going up a little bit more. longer term we're heading down. two, three weeks we're going to go up just a little bit more. after that, down we go. >> susie: why is that? >> well, i think we're coming to the close of the heating season. we already have an idea of what days we have left of heating. and it's not using up enough. so they've kept a lot in reserve, a lot of speculation coming to the market, and it's not getting used up. two, three weeks we have a great idea of where we will sit heating season wise. after that, down we go displuz for most of the u.s., households use natural gas. they don't use heating oil. and the ones that do are mostly in the northeast. so com
with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your heart with me. a discussion on the importance of interface based leadership on the city's violence prevention initiative predict and organize for a safer san francisco is where we're opening up
't use drugs or alcohol, can't return to his home, the scene of the shooting. must ask permission to leave his town and has to check in with police twice a week. the world was watching today as it watched pistorius make olympic history last summer. outside the courthouse, a crowd gathered. >> maybe it was out of anger. but i think he should be granted bail. he's not a monster. >> i don't think he deserves bail at all. >> reporter: today, a newly free pistorius was running from cameras, still facing trial and due back in court in june. michelle kosinski, nbc news, pretoria. >>> lance armstrong faces serious new legal trouble tonight. the justice department has joined one of his former racing teammates, suing him for using performance enhancing drugs during the tour de france. nbc news justice correspondent pete williams in our washington newsroom with more on this story tonight. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, the justice department claims lance armstrong was cheating the federal government when he raced in the tour de france on a team sponsored by the u.s. postal service.
fingers. we elected them to be responsible. >> reporter: the president has used every political weapon in his arsenal to raise public fears over the sequester. for the second day in a row, his homeland security secretary expressed concern about safety. >> i've been in government and public service a long time, a long time, 20 years almost. i have never seen anything like this. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder was equally pessimistic. >> the reality is that there is going to be harm, there is going to be pain and the american people are going to be less safe. >> reporter: the president's pr offensive is not playing well among republicans on capitol hill, where tempers flared again today. >> we have moved the bill in the house twice. we should not have to move a third bill before the senate gets off their ass and begins to do something. >> reporter: as for what's sinking in with the public, a new nbc news/"wall street journal" poll indicates growing reservation about the sequester. 52% call it a bad idea. just 21% believe it's a good one. but overall, cutting spending is a popul
would have thought when some of us voted for just a common market all those years ago that the eu would now be interfering potentially and what benefits we should be paying two romanians and bulgarians before they have made any occupation to our society? is it any wonder people feel disillusioned and callous? but isn't the good news is, who is more likely to vote to give people a genuine choice of a referendum, a liberal or a conservative or eastland? >> well, i'm delighted by my honorable friend managed to slip the point in at the end. i won't urge any i will friends to make their way to support the reelection and the campaign. but the point, the point that he makes is very important, which is we need to look through every aspect of how we welcome people to our country, and make sure why we must to be fair, we must not be a soft touch. so i am making sure we look at our health service, we look at housing, we look at benefits. with that illegally, we look at all other things and make sure proper and tough controls of people who want to come and live here. >> the treasury was required to
there in that video this morning. they have the capability to be held and used to produce rapid fire. i asked a question on month ago, what purpose does serve in civilians hands are on the street. i haven't received an answer yet but they did blurt the second amendment. 2nd amendment. it wasn't about the 2nd amendment. i defend the second amendment. and i want to see that upheld and regulated and it hasn't been. when that was written on most 300 years ago we didn't have the weapons we have today in the technology. they had muskets and cannons. i think it was 1934 when the ban was put on machine guns, the regulation. we haven't had a mass killing with a machine gun since. i feel these so-called assault weapons that have certain characteristics should fall in that category and be banned. >> thank you mr. heslin, thank you very much. at one point steinbeck had to write a small paragraph that said basically, people are asking what happened. this was after his wife joined him in seattle and when he says we get is not charlie and john. and somebody must have said tim hey where's charlie? yes disapp
. this is thursday february 7th. good morning i'm tony perkins. >> and i'm allison seymour. happy you are with us on this thursday morning. a calm thursday morning. so far weather wise. >> yes, it is. tucker barnes can tell us what more we can expect. >> good morning tony and allison. a cold start to your day. temperatures falling back into the 20s. we're just 33 here in town. cool afternoon cloud cover highs in the upper 30s to 40s. lots to talk about weather wise. let's kick it off and talk about your current temperatures. 33 at reagan national. dulles at 27. and bwi marhsall we're now 28. looking at the satellite radar, two storms one off to the north and west and the major player over the next couple days that system down in the northern gulf, that's going to take shape here and move up the eastern sea board and bottom line bring us a lot of clouds today. for cost for today cloud cover and late tonight and during tomorrow a wintery mix transitioning to rain and a period of snow late friday before the whole system wraps up late friday and early saturday morning. this system we'll talk a lot ab
of the school. what mattered 60 boys used to come to classes here but 40 have not -- 160 voyage used to come to classes here. 40 have not returned. their parents are too afraid to send them. in a country where spending on education is near rock bottom, the schools have seen some investment. one student who wants to be a policeman tells us have used to be. >> we have new chairs, carpets, and tables, he says. everything is gone. i feel very sad. and we worry the attackers will come back. >> we held a license. >> the headmaster has been so worried he has bought a gun. are you ready to use this to defend the people? >> yes. to defend my children. and my teachers. [indiscernible] we try to teach our children. >> back to the girls' school, classes are over for the day. the people's head for home. among them, many other school girls who are a steady in courage. >> you're watching "bbc world news america." could this building be the center of the chinese military cyber-attacks against the u.s.? we will show you what we found. today it was her comments about the duchess of cambridge that caused a fir
important meetings of the year. shinzo abe is flying to washington for his first talks with u.s. president barack obama since he took office in december. their agenda is packed and their discussions are expected to touch on everything from a wide-ranging free trade deal to punishing north korea. >> translator: i want the summit talks to show the international community that japan and the united states have restored the strong bond of their alliance. >> abe says that alliance became unstable during the former democratic party-led administration. he says he's going to talk to obama about the u.s.-led negotiations for the transpacific partnership. nations that joined the discussions for the free trade agreement are supposed to in principle eliminate all tariffs, but abe doesn't want to abide by the precondition. abe and obama are expected to share ideas on what to do about north korea. scientists in the country last week carried out their third nuclear test. they are agreed to push for a nuclear resolution imposing new sanctions on pyongyang. >>> government officials say the prime minister wi
world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org.
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